Workshop Schedule

“Workshops” are a specific track within the SIGCSE Technical Symposium’s main program, available at an additional cost to registered SIGCSE TS participants. This page does not include information about Affiliated Events or Sponsor Sessions, which are listed within the agenda on the main program schedule page.

Workshops will take place duing these time blocks:

How to register for workshops : You can add workshops to your Symposium registration when you register through Cvent for an additional cost. Symposium registration is required to attend any SIGCSE TS 2022 workshop.

Wednesday Workshops

Workshop 101 : Teaching Distributed Computing Fundamentals using Raspberry Pi Clusters

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Elizabeth Shoop, Macalester College, USA; Richard Brown, St. Olaf College, USA; Joel Adams, Calvin University, USA; Suzanne Matthews, United States Military Academy, USA

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Do you need a fast way to incorporate parallel and distributed computing (PDC) topics into your computer science curriculum without radically changing your syllabus? Are you fretting about ABET’s new PDC requirements? Don’t worry -- it’s easy as (Raspberry) pi! Join us in this fun hands-on workshop where we will show you how to introduce students to PDC concepts using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) on affordable Raspberry Pi Beowulf clusters. This in-person workshop is based on part of our NSF-sponsored 2021 CSinParallel summer workshop. Except for participants' laptops (required), all workshop materials will be provided or will be freely available at CSinParallel.org.

Workshop 102 : Using Subgoal Labeling in Teaching CS1

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Adrienne Decker, University at Buffalo, USA; Briana Morrison, University of Virginia, USA; Austin Cory Bart, University of Delaware, USA

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Subgoal labeling is a technique for increasing student understanding of introductory programming concepts and problem-solving performance. Come participate in this workshop to find out how to incorporate subgoal labeling into your introductory programming classroom. Examples, exercises, assessments, and an e-book will be shared as well as experiences using this technique. You will leave with access to subgoal labels, worked examples, and practice for common topics in an imperative Java-based CS1. See https://www.cs1subgoals.org/ for more information. Participants will be reimbursed for the workshop registration fee from an NSF grant. Laptop required.

Workshop 103 : Improving the structure and content of early CS courses with well aligned, engaging materials

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Kalpathi Subramanian, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA; Erik Saule, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA; Jamie Payton, Temple University, USA; Matthew Mcquaigue, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Do you want to improve your classes? Find better and engaging materials that show relevance to real-world problems and applications? This workshop will teach you modern course design techniques, how they can help you find new content for your class, and how to design new content for your class to be engaging. In particular you will learn to use two tools, CS Materials for course design and material search, and BRIDGES for engaging students with real world relevance and interactive visualizations. Although we would love for you to use these tools, the lessons learnt in this workshop are actionable in your courses independently. Bring a laptop!

CANCELLED —Workshop 104 : Tools and Techniques for Increasing and Measuring Student Engagement with pre-recorded videos

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Ananda Gunawardeba, Rutgers University, USA

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Are you looking for new ways to engage and motivate your students to better utilize pre-recorded lecture videos? Do you want to learn how to curate ordinary videos to make them awesome? We can help! Join us to learn free new tools (www.cubits.ai) and techniques that enable your existing YouTube/Vimeo videos to be curated (search, self-assessment, community) to increase student engagement. We will show you how easy it is to increase student interaction with curated videos and get amazing insights into student behavior using real-time data visualizations. There is nothing to change in your current course structure to integrate these tools and techniques. Just bring your laptop and video playlist, plug and play.

Workshop 105 : Mobile Application Development in Flutter

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Larry Heimann, Carnegie Mellon University, USA; Oscar Veliz, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Want to teach mobile app development but don't know where to start? Then this is the workshop for you! This interactive and hands-on session will guide you the process of making your first mobile app and then help you build apps that solve real-world problems. Our team from Carnegie Mellon University Department of Information Systems has developed a curriculum using Flutter, to rapidly onboard students into making apps that run on both iOS and Android. We will share all our open-source resources, and provide step-by-step instruction, so that you can feel confident teaching this in your classroom. You've never heard of Flutter? It is a framework, made by Google, that lets you build across platforms like iOS and Android. You program it in Dart, which looks like JavaScript, and is incredibly straight-forward to pick up. Come to the workshop and we will explain the whole process. One bit of prep you will need to do is install the necessary tools before the session. All setup instructions will be provided ahead of time. Laptop required. We'll see you at our workshop!

CANCELLED —Workshop 106 : Heterogeneous Computing for Undergraduates: Introducing the ToUCH Module Repository

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Apan Qasem, Texas State University, USA; David Bunde, Knox College, USA

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

From smartphones to supercomputers, computing systems are increasingly composed of multiple, heterogeneous processing elements. Performance-oriented programmers will need to become skilled at managing heterogeneous systems and all computer scientists will need some awareness of heterogeneity. How can we reflect this in our courses and prepare our students for programming in an increasingly heterogeneous environment? Come learn how to introduce incorporate heterogeneous computing into YOUR curriculum. We will present modules suitable for a variety of courses, including CS 2, Algorithms, Computer Organization, Systems, and Parallel Programming. The workshop includes time for hands-on exploration of the modules and tutorials on using Jupyter notebooks and Google colabs in teaching heterogeneous computing. You can preview the modules at https://github.com/TeachingUndergradsCHC/modules. This workshop is designed for college-level instructors. Laptop required. Programming components will use web-based resources. We will reimburse the workshop registration fee for participants from US institutions.

Workshop 107 : Automating Personalized Feedback to Improve Students' Persistence in Computing

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Lina Battestilli, North Carolina State University, USA; Susan Fisk, Kent State University, USA; Cynthia Hunt, Kent State University, USA; Bita Akram, North Carolina State University, USA; Spencer Yoder, North Carolina State University, USA; Thomas Price, North Carolina State University, USA; Tiffany Barnes, North Carolina State University, USA

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Have you ever wondered how your feedback impacts your students and what you can do to improve it? In this workshop, we will discuss how feedback influences students’ self-assessments of computing ability and, in turn, students’ persistence in computing. Workshop content will be drawn from: 1) social-psychological research on self-assessments of ability and career choice, and 2) the results of a 3-year field experiment in an undergraduate computer science department at a R1 research university. Negative feedback (particularly poor grades, which tend to be lower in computing than other university classes) makes it so that some students with enough ability to succeed in a computing career leave the field because they believe they have inadequate computing ability. Preliminary results from our field experiment suggest that giving CS0/CS1 students personalized feedback (via email from the professor) is effective at increasing students’ self-assessed computing ability, intentions to persist in computing, and the likelihood that women apply to be CS TAs. Despite these benefits, giving personalized email feedback may seem too time-consuming for faculty to adopt. This workshop will help instructors give efficient and efficacious personalized feedback through: 1) empirically validated email templates, and 2) guidance on how to send personalized emails at-scale. This workshop is intended for college/university instructors, especially those who teach introductory CS0/CS1 courses. Participants will need a laptop, Chrome Browser and a Google account. Workshop participants will come away knowing why email interventions work, how to design them effectively and send them with low effort, and a network of like-minded instructors in their community, who can support their efforts to improve students' self-assessments and persistence in computing. Laptop required.

Workshop 108 : Teaching Cybersecurity: Introducing the Security Mindset

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : Remote

Workshop organizers : Julia Bernd, International Computer Science Institute, USA; Dan Garcia, University of California, Berkeley, USA; Buffie Holley, Albemarle High School, USA; Maritza Johnson, University of San Diego, USA

Wednesday Workshops - Wednesday, March 2 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

This interactive workshop will introduce some of the foundational concepts of cybersecurity, including threat modeling, the importance of identity and authentication, and human factors in security. Through participating in model lessons, attendees will learn how to begin developing the "security mindset" in CS students. The workshop will provide an introduction for high school teachers new to cybersecurity (no previous experience required!), and an alternative approach for the more cyber-experienced. (No special equipment required either.) The Teaching Security materials available at teachingsecurity.org were prepared by subject-matter experts. They are designed to address some of the cybersecurity learning objectives in the AP Computer Science Principles framework, but are appropriate for any high school or community college computer science class or program (including dedicated cybersecurity classes). Why teach cybersecurity? Cybersecurity is a growing job field -- and even for students that don't pursue cybersecurity careers, it is crucial to have some level of security awareness to navigate our highly networked world! In addition, the real world implications of the topic lend themselves well to catching the interest of a diverse group of students in CS at a younger age. Laptop optional.

Friday Workshops

Workshop 301 : Getting started with source code analysis for programming education research

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Neil C. C. Brown, King's College London, UK; Michael Kölling, , King's College London, UK; Charalampos Kyfonidis, King's College London, UK; Pierre Weill-Tessier, King's College London, UK

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Automated syntactic source code analysis is a useful technique for computing education researchers to examine what kind of code students are writing and for looking at patterns in the structure of the code. It can be difficult to get started with this sort of analysis, however: it requires collection of sufficient source code data, and the analysis involves using custom parsers and processing syntax trees. mnbThis workshop will help computing education researchers to get started with source code analysis. We will provide attendees with an opportunity to work with an existing data set of Java code -- Blackbox Mini -- using SrcML, an XML-based format for parsed code, and Python tools for processing and analysing this data. At the end of this workshop, attendees will be able to start their own research studies of this type, allowing powerful analysis of program source code. A very basic familiarity with Python and Java is assumed. Please bring your own device, with WiFi and an SSH client (built-in to Mac and Linux, on Windows download PuTTY).

Workshop 302 : Transform Your Computer Science Course with Specifications Grading

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : David L. Largent, Ball State University, USA; Christian Roberson, Florida Southern College, USA; Carlo Sgro, Conestoga College, Canada; Manuel Pérez Quiñones, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA; Linda F. Wilson, Texas Lutheran University, USA

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Are you tired of spending time dealing with students who complain over fractions of points? Do you get frustrated spending most of your marking time on work that is not remotely close to what you expected? What if there was a better way to do grading that actually measured student learning outcomes, caused fewer arguments, and took less time? Well, there is, and it’s called Specifications Grading. This workshop will explain what Specifications Grading is and enable you to apply these techniques to the courses you teach. Although the presenters come from higher education, the concepts presented in this workshop are applicable to you, whether you are a middle school, high school, or university teacher. Having access to one or more of your current syllabi and/or assignment instructions during this interactive workshop may be helpful but is not required. You will leave the workshop with a plan to modify at least one of your courses and will receive access to many examples and resources created by the presenters. Laptop recommended.

Workshop 303 : Guiding Students to Discover CS Concepts and Develop Process Skills Using POGIL

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Olga Glebova, Georgia State University, USA; Kendra Walther, University of Southern California, USA; Clif Kussmaul, Green Mango Associates, LLC, USA

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

This hands-on workshop is designed for CS instructors who have never taught with (or even heard of) Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning. We will experience POGIL practices as we work through POGIL-style activities as students and as teachers, to understand what a POGIL class is like for students and teachers, how POGIL activities are structured, and how POGIL improves student outcomes. Devices are optional.

CANCELLED —Workshop 304 : A Tutorial for Adopting the uMPS3/Pandos Project in the Operating Systems Course

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Michael Goldweber, Xavier University, USA; Renzo Davoli, Università di Bologna, Italiy

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

An operating system is a software artifact. Like all software artifact-based courses (e.g. compilers, neural networks), the gold standard accompanying lab exercise is to build an instance of the artifact. uMPS3/Pandos is a new semester-long project, independent of text choice, for use in an operating systems course. The project guides students in writing, from scratch, a complete, though simple, operating system in C to run on an emulated MIPS-based system. This workshop will introduce participants to, uMPS3, the system emulator, the Pandos project –a detailed set of specifications/assignments that result in a completed operating system capable of concurrently executing up to eight student written C programs, and the wealth of supporting educational materials designed to aid both the instructor and their students. Though a Linux (Debian or Ubuntu) laptop (virtualization is fine) will allow for a hands-on experience with uMPS3/Pandos; one is not required for the workshop. Participants will learn how to use uMPS3, and will walk through each of the three core assignments and sample solutions. The workshop will culminate with the execution of participant written C program(s) running under a completed instance of Pandos. This workshop is designed to empower anyone who teaches an operating systems course to be successful in deploying uMPS3/Pandos in their operating system course. Preferred - laptop that either (dual) boots Linux, or is set up to run Linux via virtualization software.

Workshop 305 : Designing TA Training Programs for Broadening Participation

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Dee Weikle, James Madison University, USA; Michael Stewart, James Madison University, USA; Sharon Simmons, James Madison University, USA

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

This workshop is designed to support participants in creating or improving teaching assistant (TA) programs at their university with an emphasis on how the program can positively impact broadening participation. Best practices for the organization, recruitment and training of TAs will be explored. During the workshop, participants will be given a “Literature Best Practices” worksheet that we have created to help them identify the key issues in designing a TA program with inclusiveness in mind. The best practices include all aspects of a TA program from recruitment to training including funding. Ideas from programs at small liberal arts institutions to those at large research institutions will be addressed. Participants will have opportunities to work in smaller groups to strategize what their individual programs need and explore our list of resources to solve their problems. In addition we will workshop some of the training materials we are using with our Teaching Assistants to encourage participants to adopt appropriate materials for their context. Participants should bring a laptop to download electronic resources and to work on the Literature Practices Worksheet. When participants leave, they will have a framework they can use to discuss issues around diversity and inclusion in TA programs along with specific action items for their institution. In addition, they will have met others in the workshop that can support them as they return to implement positive change. It is encouraged to have multiple participants from the same university attend. The workshop is primarily oriented toward current faculty and department chairs at four year universities, with or without graduate students, but community college faculty and graduate students may also find the material useful and would be welcome. Laptop is recommended.

Workshop 306 : Innovation in Undergraduate Data Science Education

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Eric Van Dusen, University of California, Berkeley, USA; John DeNero, University of California, Berkeley, USA; Kseniya Usovich, University of California, Berkeley, USA

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Come and learn about UC Berkeley’s new Data Science Undergraduate Program, with over 1000 majors currently declared. The program is based on Data 8, a popular introductory course, and Data 100, each of which are taught with an open stack of technology built to scale. The design of the major and outline of courses will be elaborated. We will discuss the efforts to make data science interdisciplinary and inclusive and incorporate ethics into the curriculum. Workshop participants will have the opportunity for a hands-on demonstration of some of the curricular materials. This workshop is intended for: Faculty looking to add or adapt Data Science courses; Departments looking to add Data Science as a course of study ; People interested in open teaching technologies and curriculum. Bringing a laptop is recommended for hands on curriculum demonstrations. By engaging with students’ interest in the applications of computing on data, and integrating societal impact from the start, the program has developed a long-term commitment to advance computational skills for large numbers of students. These innovations in teaching not only convey important computational content, but also broaden participation beyond existing approaches to computer science. Goals include increasing diversity among students learning computer science, giving students a strong ethical foundation within their computer science work, and encouraging critical thinking in the application of inference and statistical techniques. Laptop is recommended. Food and beverages will be provided!

CANCELLED —Workshop 307 : STARS Ignite: A Program for Supporting Professors inOrganizing Student Cohorts for Conferences

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Amy Isvik, North Carolina State University, USA; Veronica Catete, North Carolina State University, USA; Lina Battestilli, North Carolina State University, USA; Tiffany Barnes, North Carolina State University, USA; Jamie Payton, Temple University, USA; Chelsea Zackey, Temple University, USA

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

In response to the increasing need to address systemic inequities, departments are creating “BPC plans” to publicly declare how they are working to broaden participation in computing, as well as diversity, equity, and inclusion, particularly for groups who have been marginalized or traditionally underrepresented in computing. A popular activity in these plans is to take a cohort of students to a diversity-focused computing conference, such as Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing (supporting people of color), the STARS Celebration of Diversity in Computing (promoting student and faculty BPC leadership and action), or the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. However, as faculty who have done this in the past, the experience is not always one that clearly benefits the CS department, beyond impacting each individual student attending the conference. The purpose of the STARS Ignite Workshop is to provide faculty and staff with a framework including the tools and knowledge needed to make such conference attendance beneficial both to the students attending the conference and to the sponsoring faculty and their department. In this workshop, participants will learn to recruit and lead a BPC purpose-driven student conference cohort and the implementation of a BPC event or program. Participants will be provided with opportunities to adapt sample materials (recruitment emails, applications, etc.) to their own needs, assess the BPC needs at their institutions, and learn how to determine if their BPC efforts are successful. A laptop and Google account are required for this event. Interested attendees should be willing to commit to leading a student conference cohort to a diversity-oriented computing conference and then implementing a BPC event or program with these students. Laptop required.

Workshop 308 : Making Art with and about Artificial Intelligence: Three Approaches to Teaching AI and AI Ethics to Middle and High School Students

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 / 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Benjamin Walsh, University of Colorado Boulder, USA; Safinah Ali, MIT Media Lab, USA; Francisco Castro, New York University, USA; Kayla Desportes, New York University, USA; Daniella DiPaola, MIT Media Lab, USA; Irene Lee, MIT STEP Lab, USA; William Payne, New York University, USA; Scott Sieke, CU Science Discovery, USA and Helen Zhang, Boston College, USA

Friday Workshops - Friday, March 4 @ 7:00 PM-10:00 PM (ET)

This hands-on workshop invites you to experience key moments in Artificial Intelligence curricula designed for middle and high school students. danceON, DAILy and Imagine AI are NSF funded projects that combine technical AI content knowledge with ethics instruction and the opportunity to create art with and about AI. During this session attendees will receive an in-depth introduction to two of the three projects (of their choice), including the free tools and resources associated with each, and discuss approaches for making AI and AI ethics interesting and relevant for diverse groups of learners. This workshop is intended for middle and high school educators interested in AI, as well as researchers interested in this context. All attendees should bring a laptop or Chromebook. A webcam and microphone are recommended but not required.

Saturday Workshops

Workshop 401 : Designing Autograders for Novice Programmers

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 / 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Chad Hogg, Millersville University, USA; Maria Jump, Northeastern University, USA

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 @ 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Students in introductory courses have under-developed debugging skills, intuition, and vocabulary, which makes it difficult for those students to understand logic errors in their code and to interpret messages designed to assist them in doing so. This is particularly true when instructors are relying on automated grading frameworks to providing students with instantaneous feedback. This Designing Autograders for Novice Programmers workshop will present and discuss strategies for using industry-standard testing frameworks to design automatic tests, or autograders, that are particularly targeted to the novice student. Novice students make a much wider variety of mistakes than students in upper-division courses, including many that would cause simple autograders to fail spectacularly (i.e. submitting the wrong file). For these reasons, a poorly-designed autograder may be less useful to novice students than none at all. However, we will present strategies for thoughtfully designing your autograder that will anticipate a wide variety of possible failure modes, explore deeply to discover their root causes, and explain the failures in a way that is comprehensible. We will demonstrate how we have done this using existing grading frameworks (i.e., Autogradr, Gradescope) using static analysis, unit tests, and other techniques. Both instructors who have never written autograders before and those who have but have been dissatisfied with the quality of feedback that they produce will benefit from the workshop. One of the presenters primarily works with undergraduates and the other with graduate students (who are novice programmers), but the same techniques should also be applicable in secondary education. Following discussion of design strategies and examples, attendees will work to build an autograder for a simple programming assignment and test submitting to an autograder built by another attendee. Access to a computing device that can edit text documents and upload them through a web interface will be required. Persons attending the workshop virtually should expect to have a similar experience to those attending physically.

CANCELLED —Workshop 402 : Beauty and Joy Computing: AP CS Principles & Middle School Curriculum

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 / 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Michael Ball, University of California, Berkeley, USA; Lauren Mock, University of California, Berkeley, USA; Dan Garcia, University of California, Berkeley, USA; Tiffany Barnes, North Carolina State University, USA; Marnie Hill, North Carolina State University, USA; Mary Fries, Education Development Center, USA; Pamela Fox, University of California, Berkeley, USA; Yuan Garcia, Millbrae High School, CA, USA

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 @ 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

This workshop is intended for all middle school and high school computer science teachers interested in the Beauty and Joy of Computing curriculum. BJC is an AP CS Principles course. This past year, BJC developed a new course for middle school and early high school that teaches a functional approach to programming, emphasizing iteration and commands, and including exciting projects in graphics, data, and media. In this workshop, we will provide an overview of the BJC middle school and high school curriculum. Participants will learn about how the BJC 2021 curriculum correlates with the new Big Ideas, Computational Thinking Practices and Skills, and Enduring Understandings. We also will discuss course materials, teacher resources, professional development workshops, and an introduction to Snap!, the chosen visual programming language of BJC. It is recommended, but not required, that participants bring a laptop.

Workshop 403 : Free Ebooks for Computer Science Courses: Now With Support for Peer Instruction, Choice Questions, and Exam Generation

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 / 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Barbara Ericson, University of Michigan, USA; Bradley Miller, Runestone Interactive, USA

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 @ 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Come learn about the 30 free and interactive ebooks on the open-source Runestone Interactive platform that can be used in high school (AP CSP and AP CSA) or college computing courses (CS1, CS2, data science, and web programming). These ebooks include executable and modifiable code (Python, Java, C++, SQL, etc) and a wide variety of practice problems. One of the types of practice problems, mixed-up code (Parsons) problems, will adapt their difficulty based on the learner's performance. Learn about exciting new features including support for Peer Instruction, choice questions, and exam generation. In Peer Instruction an instructor displays a hard multiple-choice question, students answer individually, then discuss with a peer (in-person or via chat), and then answer again. Peer Instruction has been shown to improve student engagement and learning. Choice questions can be used to give students a choice of which question to answer for credit. They have been used to allow students to choose to write the equivalent code rather than solve a mixed-up code (Parsons) problem. Exam questions can be automatically generated from a set of questions or from topics. Also learn how to create a custom course, enroll students in a custom course, create assignments, grade assignments, view student progress, and optionally require use of a spaced practice tool. Students enjoy using the ebooks. They appreciate the immediate feedback and the variety of practice problems. Attendees must bring a laptop. Attendees do not have to have any prior experience with Runestone ebooks.

Workshop 404 : Introducing data science topics to non-computing majors

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 / 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Modality : Remote

Workshop organizers : Xumin Liu, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA; Erik Golen, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA; Rajendra Raj, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 @ 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Are you interested in learning current data science techniques, or teaching data science at an introductory level such as to high school students or first year college students? Come and join us at this informative and hands-on workshop that is suitable for all levels of programming background, including those with little or no coding experience. After attending the workshop, you will: (1) explain different phases of the data lifecycles; (2) have in-depth experience of handling data in a computational way; (3) explain data fairness, privacy and ethics; (4) explain and apply teaching materials, including the web-based learning platform, DSLP, developed by the presenters. (5) get the data science curricular materials and access to DSLP. Highlights of the workshop: Introduction to the entire data lifecycle including data acquisition, preparation, exploration, visualization, analysis, and storytelling; Team-based hands-on experience on COVID and Titanic data; Introduction to a web-based Data Science Learning Platform (DSLP) that allows to handle and analyze data without the need of coding; and Share the teaching materials and experience. Please come with a laptop with access to the Internet. No special software is needed except for a web browser. Free registration: This workshop is sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation and the registration fees for accepted participants will be fully refunded.

Workshop 405 : Computer Science Frontiers: New Curricula to Advance Female Interest in Computing

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 / 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Veronica Catete, North Carolina State University, USA; Lauren Alvarez, North Carolina State University, USA; Shuchi Grover, Looking Glass Ventures & Stanford University, USA; Isabella Gransbury, North Carolina State University, USA; Brian Broll, Vanderbilt University, USA; Madeline Drayton, Providence High School, USA; Audrey Coats, Lynnfield High School, USA; April Collins, Martine Luther King Jr. High School; Ákos Lédeczi, Vanderbilt University, USA; Tiffany Barnes, North Carolina State University, USA

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 @ 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Attention K-12 and CS0 introductory computer science instructors, computing outreach organizers, and other SIGCSE attendees. We welcome you to join the CSF Frontiers team of university researchers and high school teachers as they present a hands-on workshop introducing new computing activities designed to attract more girls to the frontiers of the computer science discipline. The workshop will lead participants through block-based coding activities that introduce advanced topics including Internet of Things, Distributed Computing, and Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning. Attendees will also hear stories from past teachers who have used the materials in their classrooms and summer camps. Participants will need a computer with the Chrome browser installed and an internet connection.

Workshop 407 : Advancing Your Arduino Game: Early and Engaging Scaffolding for Advanced CS

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 / 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Roger Chamberlain, Washington University in St. Louis, USA; James Orr, Washington University in St. Louis, USA; Doug Shook, Washington University in St. Louis, USA; Bill Siever, Washington University in St. Louis, USA

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 @ 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Ready to take your Arduino skills to the next level? Come experience interactive, group-based learning in this workshop aimed at educators who would like to show post-CS1 students an engaging introduction to maker-oriented activities using microcontrollers. From finite-state machines to time as a functional requirement, the workshop (and associated semester-long course) introduces connections between formal theory and real-world practice and will get your students started down the path from amateur hobbyist to professional designer. A laptop with USB access is required, and all participants will be able to take home a copy of the hardware used during the workshop.

Workshop 408 : Integrating Parallel and Distributed Computing in Early CS Courses

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 / 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

Modality : In-person

Workshop organizers : Sheikh Ghafoor, Tennessee Tech University, USA; Sushil Prasad, University of Texas San Antonio, USA; Charles Weems, University of Massachusetts Amherst , USA

Saturday Workshops - Saturday, March 5 @ 3:00 PM-6:00 PM (ET)

All computing devices that students use currently have multiple cores as well as GPU in many cases. Most of their favorite applications use multiple cores and numbers of distributed processors. However, we are still teaching them to solve problems using only sequential thinking. Why? This hands-on workshop will demonstrate how easy it is to open their eyes to exploiting concurrency in problem solving, starting in their earliest courses. You'll be participating in unplugged activities that will help students to recognize examples of Parallel Distributed Computing concepts and concurrency in the world around them. Participants will learn how freely available libraries can be used to naturally exploit parallelism, though both plugged and unplugged activities. No equipment or experience is necessary for the activities though a laptop that can run C++, Java, and python is recommended for following along with some code examples. Active learning plugged and unplugged modules that have been used successfully to teach PDC concept in early CS courses will be shared. The target audience for this workshop are faculty who teaches in undergraduate computing programs, especially early computing courses, and do not have parallel and distributed computing expertise. Participants will receive a stipend of $300 to defray their cost of registration and one-night hotel stay. Laptop required.